Cristina NualART

Tag: Colour

Download and Watch Movie Tomorrow Everything Starts (2016)

Tomorrow Everything Starts (2016) HD

Director : Hugo Gélin.
Release : December 7, 2016
Country : France.
Production Company : Mars Films, Vendome Pictures.
Language : English, Français.
Runtime : 118 min.
Genre : Drama, Comedy.

Movie ‘Tomorrow Everything Starts’ was released in December 7, 2016 in genre Drama. Hugo Gélin was directed this movie and starring by Omar Sy. This movie tell story about A man without attachments or responsibilities suddenly finds himself with an abandoned baby and leaves for London to try and find the mother. Eight years later after he and his daughter become inseparable Gloria’s mother reappears.

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Hoang Tram’s art retrospective

109_HoangTramA retrospective of Vietnamese artist Hoang Tram opened yesterday in the Applied Arts Museum, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The 82 year old was signing catalogues, surrounded by large flower arrangements. On display were some works that he painted this year. I overheard a visitor saying that to produce that much art you must work lots every day. Indeed, there was a good number of works, from the 1960s until now.  How satisfying it must be to see a lifetime of artistic achievements in one place!

The drawings are all very well executed, but it’s the variety of people and faces that engages the eye more than technical precision. Faces young and old are drawn with enough roughness to appear fresh and light, but crafted well enough to prolong the gaze around the lightly-greyed in background outlines. Drawings of factory workers look quickly penciled in, but the layers of lines from dark to light take us all the way to the back of each room. The eye lingers on all the details, but never feels tired by too much mechanical exactitude. Wonderful stuff especially when it gets to the close up. Portraits full of character! The little watercolours, usually landscapes, are equally lovely – accurate but swift brushmarks to snapshop a panorama.
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The artist has had fun using different colour palettes for the oil paintings. From vibrant contrasts to harmonious muted tones to match the subject matter, they are academic paintings with that bold propaganda-style cleanliness of line.107_HoangTram

Lacquer paintings, on the other hand, use the materials’ traditional reds, blacks and golds, but suggest more abstract representations. The topics are distinguishable, but offer an imaginative, childlike, form.

The most exciting use of colour happens recently, with oil paint. Nothing too challenging or radical, just a subtle combination of retro pastels that is saturated enough to kick the brain into new readings of the picture. This is my favourite:
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A fascinating choice of pink for the murky river waters! The uniform colour blocks and the birds-eye perspective creates a flatness that reminds me of Alfred Wallis’s views of the English coastline towns. Graphically beautiful!

Breaking the surface

As a teenager I went to see a Minimalist art exhibition in Barcelona that ( I realised years later) was really influential. First, there were shaped canvases. A massive revelation for me that subconsciously spurred a few good paintings. I had to laugh, again years later, when I noticed that shaped canvases in the form of altarpieces had been at the core of Western art since the dark ages (I love that expression, though I think it’s a misnomer). The other discovery about the Minimalist show was the power of plain flat colour – and a love for Barnett Newman.

What really happened, of course, is that the picture surface took centre stage, and you never quite look at it the same again. In reading art, first you learn to separate the formal qualities (the handling of paint, the textures and shapes) from the content (what the image is about), and then you get to see that the surface and the space around it also have a love-hate relationship.
In London right now two painters have beautiful work that marries divorce. Luke Rudolf, in Kate MacGarry Gallery, chops up metallic triangles (very 80s) over luminous, blurred portraits – a bit Glenn Brown but looser. The paint, close up, is delicious! Candy acrylic that cheers you up. The spiky triangles do make the already alien-like portraits more sinister, but it’s so bright it doesn’t darken the joyous impressions. Go see them in the flesh, though, computer screens doesn’t give you the gleaming light and surface texture and the paintings just don’t look quite so appealing. And apparently the colour spectrum is ‘psychotropic,’ so it could be worth the journey – you’ll enjoy the trip back home after!

In Rivington Place, Chinese artist Jia Aili is using spiky triangles – literally. Broken mirror shards are scattered on the floor. Whereas Luke, according to the press release, ‘exploits the earnest daubs of the expressionist [sic] as well as the graphic immediacy of design,’ in referencing Modernism, Aili is inspired by Caravaggio’s The Incredulity of Saint Thomas whilst reflecting, according to Julio Etchart, on industrial progress, social corrosion and the individual’s struggle in the machine age (which surely was the main remit of 17th C Italy?).

Blurb aside, the works are both really interesting from the picture plane point of view. The fascinating part of the installation in Iniva is the extension of the picture plane with physical objects and paint.

 

 

Kenji Yoshida

The October Gallery in Bloomsbury has just opened a small and lovely exhibition of Kenji Yoshida’s paintings. Below is my favourite: large, luscious and luminous…

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I love it quite simply because it’s beautiful, and Yoshida does use two techniques that I love to use myself: metal-leaf, and batik-like application of colour. The layering of the paint, very fine here, when seen close up, is delicious. I’ve always loved that about paint, that you can have fun carefully applying and seeing it take on it’s own life at will; and getting really close to a painting so that all in your field of vision are the colours in and out of each other, touching gently or overpowering themselves, bubbling and curdling like planetary surfaces. An experience worth trying, if you never have. Zoom in.

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Here is a detail view of another painting, both of these canvases are called La Vie, as are in fact most of the ones in the show, due to the artist having his life spared, ironically, by the bombing of Hiroshima. The subsequent rendition of the Japanese army liberated Yoshida from his conscription to be a kamikaze, and he delved into painting celebrations of life forces. Major events affect us for most of our lives, that’s a known fact. What is interesting is how each individual interprets the trauma and expresses it subsequently. An early painting of mine came about from the horror of understanding what had happened in Hiroshima, after I read John Hersey’s book. I used fluorescent colours, sawdust, and a tangle of wire. And it was the first painting in which I used fire to create colour. At first I tried burning the edges of the wooden support with a lighter (outdoors – of course), but I got nowhere, so I bought a blowtorch which I was very scared to use – for the first 10 minutes. Once I got used to the weapon, the result worked well. Sometime after, I saw that Yves Klein had used burning as a form of painting too. Oh well, we all know everything has been invented already…

Back to Yoshida. I had a juicy conversation with my artist friends Emma and Richard about this exhibition. Emma disagreed with the speaker who had insisted that Yoshida’s work bore only the influence of Japanese traditions. While I realise why Emma sees its point of contact with Abstract Expressionism, her main interest (spot the painter) is in understanding the motivation behind the artist’s impetus. For Emma, it is Yoshida’s passionate aim to celebrate life that becomes the connection with Rothko et al. I believe that movements can appear simultaneously across different parts of the world, with no prior connection, due to some magical zeitgeist at work, and this would explain how the essence of the artist’s endeavour can take on meaning in various cultures. To me, in this case, even the formal aspects of both the Western and the Oriental traditions seem visible, but I have no deep knowledge of Japanese art history or context, so I am prepared to believe that Yoshida’s work comes from his cultural heritage without apparent interference of other artistic explorations. The real joy was in discussing not only the techniques, colour harmonies, and forms (mostly very beautiful) but also the emotional involvement of the artist, and the creative process. Richard delighted me with his wry comment about how curators and art historians talk dryly, whereas artist have much more rich ways of talking about painting. It’s not just the context, after all. It’s the life in the art process. Thank you both for a wonderful afternoon.

Unless otherwise specified, text and images © 2017 Cristina Nualart

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.



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