Cristina NualART

Tag: Curator

The first #curatedtweetpoem: Calliope Baristess, Cafe Warrior

I make art in series and I collect some of the things I find when walking. When I have enough of whatever it is I’m collecting, say, bones, photographs of padlocks, or pieces of driftwood, I feel that I have an art series. Then I have to make whatever interventions on the collected items (e.g. attaching pieces together with wire, painting them, printing over them, or whatever other creative methods suits me at the time) that I feel are necessary to fully appropriate them and bend the haphazard moment in which we found each other into a volitional, constructed and significant one.

For about 6 months now, I’ve been saving tweets, choosing my favourite short word arrangements and taking screenshots of them. Once I’d collected enough tweets, I was able to play around and curate them into a lyrical narrative. Here is the first Curated Tweet Poem, I call it Calliope Baristess, Cafe Warrior:

Calliope Baristess, Cafe Warrior.

 

Dear Tweeters featured here, if you should disapprove of your public tweets being part of this artwork, just let me know and you shall be un-retweeted as soon as is humanly *this-is-not-a-tweetbot* possible!

#curatedtweetpoem 2: Coldsore Love Curse

A curated poem made of Tweets. This is a metrosexual love story set in London. I re-tweeted each chosen ‘line’ in sequence from last to first, so the poem can be read on my Twitter timeline.

Coldsore Love Curse #curatedtweepoem

 

Dear Tweeters featured here, thank you for your inspiring tweets. As you know, it is common -even desirable- practice for tweets to be retweeted by interested parties. If, however, you should disapprove of your public tweets being part of this artwork, just let me know.

(First published on 30 September 2012)

#curatedtweetpoem 3: ‘The Unemployed Ice Cream Vandal and the Chauvinist Chill’

Creating order out of the seeming chaos of my Twitter timeline, the third #curatedtweetpoem makes meaning out of ice cream desire/consumption in the global economy of exploiters and exploited.

Unemployed Ice Cream Vandal and the Chauvinist Chill

 

Curated Tweet Poems are selected tweets, carefully chosen over months of Twitter activity, re-tweeted in order so they read from top to bottom with a narrative different from the purpose of the individual tweets. Again, I thank Tweeple re-tweeted here for their inspiring tweets.

(First published on 4 October 2012)

Layers of Culture

‘It is work that the artist produce outside the demands, pressures, and expectations of others in the process of wrestling with their own selves and in the serenity or turbulence of their own solitude; that work that they produce when they have no need to be serious. It is in such work also that we find the truest moments of an artist’s career and his or her most relevant contributions to culture. Which is why, for the Zairean popular painter , it is referred to as work made for our own.’

Olu Oguibe in The Culture Game, 2004

Olu tells that African scholar T. K. Biaya in a conference in New York in 1995 explained that African artists made two types of art to sell: work conceived with certain devices suited for Mungo -the Western art buyer- and artwork made leisurely and free from constraints, that the artist would also show to local art lovers.

Exit Banksy, enter Swoon

I finally saw Banksy‘s film Exit through the Giftshop, now on show in only one London cinema. Glad I made it to the big screen before it becomes just another DVD.

47_Swoon_photocnualartIt is really a good watch – tons of fun! I love the amusing turn of events that mess around with your preconceived ideas of who is the protagonist.  At first, your wishes are granted and you get lots of footage of street artists at work, and you naturally expect plenty more footage on Banksy for the main part of the film. But before I tell you what happens, I have to put Banksy on pause, to digress about Swoon, one of the street artists at work in the first part of the film, and the only female one. Swoon, as coincidence would have it, is currently featured prominently in this month’s Art News magazine, for her ‘sailing’ artspedition.

I first came across her work  in an exhibition in Village Underground, East London, last year (pictured). The Thousands was the mysterious title given to the week-short show by the very young curator. 18 year old RJ Rushmore was kind enough to give me an hour of his time to tell me about the stunningly well-light display of street art from around the world in the not-so-underground, superb space. Rushmore is a collector of Swoon and of other figureheads of street art, and some of the artworks in the exhibition were of his collection. He knows these artists first hand, from his childhood days hanging out in both London and New York, encountering the artists at work in teenage infested wastelands and alleyways. They way he told me about it all, I’m guessing that he started collecting with little cash, whereas as we see in the film, street art is now big bucks. Moral: it’s good not to be metrowealthy and grow up in plush, cleansed neighbourhoods, if the vandalism you would otherwise encounter can be turned into gold – and celebrity status. My hat off to the teenage curator/collector for utilising his life experiences to his advantage. And my hat off to Swoon for her skilfully crafted cut-outs and paste ups. She’s worth keeping an eye on.

As for Banksy, he is very clever, as well as skilled. His Guantamo Bay interventions in Disneyland are as funny as the reactions of the Mickeyguards when they discover them. See him also transform a beautiful red phonebox into an equally beautiful, and humorous, sculpture, with meaning appropriated by BT… (if, like me, you’re into red telephone boxes, check out David Mach’s sculpture in Kingston-upon-Thames).

After this exhilarating spur of live artmaking (including -and yes, I disapprove- a live, painted elephant) the way Banksy turns the film around, (by way of ‘revenge’?) is better than fiction. The cameraman and the street artist swap places, and the unexpected outcome brings about a sad-but-hilarious real-life take on the art world. Possible ponderings revolve around the power of money, of advertising, of using your friends because the ends justify the means, of the American dream, of madness or of sheer willpower. Definitely lots to think about, but smiling most of the time. Respect!

46_Swoon_photocnualart

P.S.: A really interesting piece of research on the legal quandaries implicit in graffiti:
Tomasz Rychlicki, ‘Legal questions about illegal art,’ Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice (Vol. 3, No. 6, 2008) pp. 393-401

Unless otherwise specified, text and images © 2017 Cristina Nualart

Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.



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